pack#

pack#
pack n *bundle, bunch, package, packet, bale, parcel
pack vb Pack, crowd, cram, stuff, ram, tamp are comparable when they mean to fill tightly or cause to fill tightly something which holds a limited amount or presents a limited space.
Pack, in its basic sense, implies a forming into packs or bundles for convenience in storing or transporting
{

oranges are packed in crates for shipment

}
{

pack books in cartons before moving them

}
{

in this factory huge quantities of meat are processed, packed, and shipped to all parts of the country

}
Additionally it may imply close, orderly arrangement in receptacles of determined size, and, as a corollary, compact and complete filling. In extended use it may suggest completeness of filling or, frequently, an excessive or uncomfortable filling, without any relation to the ideas of storing or transporting
{

the play packed the theater

}
{

the crowd in the bus was packed in like sardines

}
{

packs an extraordinary amount of information into a few pages— Times Lit. Sup.

}
Crowd (see also PRESS) implies the presence of great numbers of persons or things in proportion to the space, area, or time; the term often suggests numbers so great as to press upon or otherwise seriously inconvenience
{

the harbor was crowded with ships

}
{

crowd more persons into a hall than it can safely hold

}
{

in revolutions men live fast: the experience of years is crowded into hours— Macaulay

}
{

the road .. . was now crowded with people who had come up the hill for their Sunday afternoon walk— Archibald Marshall

}
{

his mind was crowded with the detail he observed— Nevil Shute

}
Cram carries a similar implication of pressing so as to bruise or squeeze, but the word usually also suggests a forcible and, sometimes, disorderly insertion into a receptacle or space of more than it can easily or comfortably or safely take
{

cram a trunk full of clothes

}
{

their storehouses crammed with grain— Shak.

}
crammed his head full of knowledge}
{

cram for an examination

}
{

most of the newcomers arrive with only such means as can be crammed into a bundle or two— Hersey

}
Stuff implies the use of such a material as padding, wadding, or straw in expanding or distending
{

stuff a pillow with feathers

}
{

stuff a mattress with straw

}
From this specific meaning comes the more general meaning of to fill so that a thing bulges or so that the filling protrudes
{

stuffed his purse with bills

}
{

stuff a turkey with dressing

}
{

I have stuffed too many of the facts of history and science into my intellectuals— L. P. Smith

}
{

as many hot hors d'oeuvres as the greediest guest could stuff into himself— Wouk

}
Ram nearly always retains some notion of its basic implication of pounding and tamping
{

ram home the charge in a muzzle-loading firearm by means of a ramrod

}
but this implication is sometimes obscured or subordinated and that of stuffing or cramming as if by pounding in is stressed
{

ram tobacco into his pipe

}
{

I always ram my clothes into a boxBury

}
{

pronging great slices of meat onto his fork and ramming them into his mouth— Bruce Marshall

}
Tamp, which often comes close to ram in meaning, originally meant and still means to plug up a drill hole above a blasting charge with clay, earth, or similar material. In its extended use it implies a series of blows which press something into a confined space or under, over, or about another thing that needs to be supported
{

tamping the gravel back around the ties— Laird

}
{

tamp tobacco into his pipe

}
Analogous words: *compact, consolidate: *press, squeeze, jam: compress, constrict, *contract

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Нужен реферат?

Look at other dictionaries:

  • pack — pack …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Pack — Pack, n. [Akin to D. pak, G. pack, Dan. pakke, Sw. packa, Icel. pakki, Gael. & Ir. pac, Arm. pak. Cf. {Packet}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A bundle made up and prepared to be carried; especially, a bundle to be carried on the back; a load for an animal;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pack — [ pak ] n. m. • 1817; angl. pack ice « paquet de glace » 1 ♦ Mar. Banquise ou agglomération de glace de mer en dérive. 2 ♦ (1912) Au rugby, L ensemble des avants. Recomm. offic. paquet. 3 ♦ (1970) Anglic. Emballage réunissant un lot d une même… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Pack — (p[a^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Packed} (p[a^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Packing}.] [Akin to D. pakken, G. packen, Dan. pakke, Sw. packa, Icel. pakka. See {Pack}, n.] 1. To make a pack of; to arrange closely and securely in a pack; hence, to place and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pack — may refer to: Backpack Pack (canine), family structure of wild animals of the biological family Canidae Pack hunter, other animals that hunt in a group Cub scouts group, or a group or gang in a larger sense, as in Leader of the Pack. Playing… …   Wikipedia

  • Pack — bezeichnet: im abwertenden Sinne Gesindel eine gebündelte Verpackung die Klimaanlage bei Flugzeugen, die von den Triebwerken angetrieben wird, siehe Klimaanlage (Flugzeug) eine 1977 gegründete Punkband aus München Pack bezeichnet in der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • pack — pack1 [pak] n. [ME pakke < MDu pak < MFl pac: term carried throughout Europe via the Low Countries wool trade (as in Fr pacque, It pacco, Ir pac, ML paccus)] 1. a large bundle of things wrapped or tied up for carrying, as on the back of a… …   English World dictionary

  • pack — Ⅰ. pack [1] ► NOUN 1) a cardboard or paper container and the items inside it. 2) Brit. a set of playing cards. 3) a collection of related documents. 4) a group of animals that live and hunt together. 5) chiefly derogatory a group or set of… …   English terms dictionary

  • Pack — Pack, v. i. 1. To make up packs, bales, or bundles; to stow articles securely for transportation. [1913 Webster] 2. To admit of stowage, or of making up for transportation or storage; to become compressed or to settle together, so as to form a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pack — [n1] kit, package backpack, baggage, bale, bundle, burden, equipment, haversack, knapsack, load, luggage, outfit, parcel, rucksack, truss; concepts 260,446,496 pack [n2] group, bunch assemblage, band, barrel, bundle, circle, collection, company,… …   New thesaurus

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”